Friday , September 24 2021

The video shows a meteorite turning the sky over Turkey a bright green



A Twitter user in the city of Izmir, Turkey, shared the incredible images that appeared to show the sky illuminating a bright green before the object was thrown to the ground.

The videos have sparked speculation about what the object might be, some suggest it is a satellite or some intergalactic junk and others believe it could be aliens.

Fingers crossed by aliens, eh? I think this is exactly what you need in 2021, to be honest.

Credit: Twitter / h_ibrahimcakan
Credit: Twitter / h_ibrahimcakan

Witnesses reported hearing a loud explosion next to the spectacle of celestial light, which could have been the object that broke when it entered the Earth’s atmosphere or the sound hitting the deck at high speed.

Posting on Twitter, a resident said, “A strange, bright object believed to be a rocket debris crashed in Turkey. Satellite?”

While another wrote, “UFOs have been seen in the sky.”

However, before taking the tin leaf hat, the professor of astrophysics, Dr. Hasan Ali Dal, shared his expert opinion, if not at all less exciting.

Posting on Twitter, he said the bright colors were caused by a “fireball,” which happens when a meteor begins to burn when it enters the planet’s atmosphere.

Credit: Twitter / h_ibrahimcakan
Credit: Twitter / h_ibrahimcakan

He explained: “It usually burns in the upper atmosphere.

“It should be considered as a more specific version of the phenomenon known as a shooting star among people and is often lived during periods of meteor shower.”

The meteor could be part of the Perseid meteor shower, which occurs every year during the months of July and August.

The annual event occurs when the Earth passes through an area full of debris from Comet Swift-Tuttle.

The meteor shower of Perseids.  Credit: PA
The meteor shower of Perseids. Credit: PA

These meteors usually burn before landing, but it can be a good time of year to try to spot one in the sky, as during the peak season dozens of meteors can be seen every hour.

If you fancy seeing one, earthsky.com estimates that the best days are August 11, 12 and 13.

To give you the absolute best chance of seeing one, head to a place with minimal light pollution before dawn.


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