Friday , May 20 2022

Science reveals secrets behind the language of your cat's sand News



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WASHINGTON (AP) – Lovers of cats know when young men are squeezed, their tongues are pretty scratchy. Using high-tech scans and other tricks, scientists learn that these sandy languages ​​help cats to stay clean and cold.

Secret: tiny hips moving in a tongue – with bundles embedded to carry the spit deep into all that fur.

A team of engineers announced on Monday that they were more than curiosity. They can lead to inventions for pets and people.

"Their tongue could help us apply fluids, we clean carpets or apply medicine," added Alekis Noel, a researcher of US company Georgia Tech, who is seeking a patent for a 3D printed brush inspired by languages.

Cats are wonderful, spending up to a quarter of their waking up. Noel's interest was pinched when her cat, Murphi, took the tongue in a gentle blanket. For a long time, scientists have thought that tongue-tongue is squeezed into small cone shapes. Noel, who works in a laboratory known for animal-inspired engineering, wondered why.

First, CT scan scanners showed that they were not covered with solid cones but in claw hooks. They lie flat and turn backward, from the path, while a small spine fades straight along the tongue of the lingual mouse, she explained.

Great surprise: These spins contain hollow spheres, finds Noel. Switching to zoos and taxidermists to preserved test languages, she found bobcats, cougars, a leopard substance, even lions and tigers share this feature.

When Noel touched the cans of the canned kidneys – called papillas – with droplets of food color, they wiped out the liquid. Nearly 300 papillary glasses hold a small amount of saliva that is released when the tongue is pressing on the fur, and then even more breeding.

The surface of the tongue is wet. But Noel saw clues that the spines are essential for deep cleansing.

Papillas are just a little longer in lions than in homes, although many of the larger lingual languages ​​hold hundreds of others, according to Professor Noel and Georgia Tech David L. Hu from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Then, Noel measured the cat's fur, which has a lot of air to insulate as down. For sure enough, compress the fur in many types of cats, the distance to the skin corresponds to the length of the spine of the tongue, she found. Exception: Persian cats with a super long fur that caution the veterinarian must brush every day to avoid tensing.

The machine that imitated the movements of the feline lure revealed that the saliva from the surface of the tongue simply can not penetrate so deeply. A thermal camera showed how they got caught, the evaporating saliva cooled the cats.

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