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Rugby: TJ Perenara speaks against the comments of Taniela Tupou after the series Israel Folau



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All black media TJ Perenara have addressed some controverted comments about religion in the consequences of the Israel Folau saga.

Last week, Wallabies near Taniela Tupou said that all the inhabitants of the Pacific islands "could also be fired" because of their religious beliefs after teammate Samu Kerevi felt he needed to apologize for "Offend" the fans after saying that "I love Jesus" Easter.

The comments arrived days before Folau tried to save his career of several million dollars in a code of conduct of Australia of Rugby after receiving a high level violation for publications of social media where he said that " hell I expected homosexuals. "

"Really," Tupou's place started.

"I could also plunder myself and all the other rugby players in the Pacific Islands around the world because we have the same Christian beliefs.

Taniela Tupou of Australia. Photo / Getty
Taniela Tupou of Australia. Photo / Getty

"I will never apologize for my faith and for what I believe, religion had [sic] It has nothing to do with rugby in any way #TYJ ".

When addressing Radio Sport's comments, Perenara said he felt it was not good that Tupou spoke to all players in the Māori and Pacific islands in the game.

"To make a statement for everyone, I do not think so," Jim Kayes told Radio Sport. "Without a doubt, you can make your own statement if that is how you feel, but you can not paint a brush on all the Pacific maori or islanders who have religious beliefs.

"You can not talk to everyone."

Folau's green and gold career ended up being in the cards as Rugby Australia issued the high-level gap as the only option that could lead to termination.

Raylene Castle and Andrew Hoare arrive before the code of conduct of Rugby Australia in social media publications by Israel Folau. Photo / Getty
Raylene Castle and Andrew Hoare arrive before the code of conduct of Rugby Australia in social media publications by Israel Folau. Photo / Getty

But Perenara, who attends today at the Wellington International Pride parade with his wife, agreed that the saga should end sooner rather than later for the sake of the game and young players who were being influenced by negative messages.

"Obviously, this is a tender subject for many people and, especially, I am particularly sorry for the young people who are influenced by these words and who are trying to find themselves at the time," he said.

"As leaders of our community, we must empower these people and let them know that it is good to be who you are, it is good to feel your way of feeling and that being good.

"This is the message that we should send, the love and the unity and empowerment of people is what we should do."

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