Saturday , April 17 2021

The Skate park gets a permanent home in the red Christchurch area on the edge of the beach



An offer close to three decades for a permanent skate park in the Christchurch neighborhood of Sumner has skipped its last obstacle.

The concrete concrete park will be built at 26 Nayland St, county property, at a cost of 539,900 dollars from taxpayers in the year 2020-21. Half of the budget will be used to protect against rocks from the cliff above the site.

The Council of the Community of Linwood-Central-Heathcote unanimously approved the site in December, but the decision was proposed to the Crown to transfer the properties of neighboring red zones – 20 and 24 Nayland St – to the council.

A permanent park of skates will be created in Sumner during the 2020-21 exercise. Half of the city council budget will be used to protect against rocks from the cliff above the site.

STATIONS / STUFF LEVELS

A permanent park of skates will be created in Sumner during the 2020-21 exercise. Half of the city council budget will be used to protect against rocks from the cliff above the site.

On Friday, the great regimental minister of Christchurch, Megan Woods, announced that the transfer would continue.

READ MORE: The Skate park will be built in Sumner, after 29 years of waiting

The two properties would become a park to create an "acoustic buffer" between the skate park and the homes of the towns, Woods said.

Skaters currently use a ramp built by the community on the corner of the streets of Wakefield and Nayland.

STATIONS / STUFF LEVELS

Skaters currently use a ramp built by the community on the corner of the streets of Wakefield and Nayland.

But neighbor resident Judy Brown did not think the park was sufficient for a tampon.

The skate park was already noisy and it was scary that skaters used the park next to their home.

"Where I am living now, feel" blows, blows, blows, blows. "I feel very insecure to live in my house," he said.

The neighbor Judy Brown is worried about the noise that already comes from the skate park.

STATIONS / STUFF LEVELS

The neighbor Judy Brown is worried about the noise that already comes from the skate park.

"I have returned to Sumner for a quiet retirement: now it's hell on earth."

Sumner Green and Skate spokesman Mike Sleigh said earlier that it was 29 years ago that residents asked the city council to build a skate park on the seashore.

Meanwhile, skateboards have used members of the community of ramps built on the corner of the streets of Wakefield and Nayland.

Woods said: "The Crown will grant transitory use over the key red zone to Sumner as part of a provisional agreement while we complete the transfer."


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