Thursday , July 7 2022

Birth of the rectangle: NASA discovers the video of a strange rectacular berg that is born



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The strange rectangular iceberg that NASA recorded in Antarctica was "born" far earlier, which was discovered by a new satellite image.

It is believed that a rectangular ice pitcher is freshly calved from Larsen C, which in July 2017 released a massive ice flank A68, a piece of ice-size Delavari state.

"Berg was so clean, it was reasonable to assume that perhaps it was recently tired of Larsen C ice shelf," NASA said.

However, new satellite images reveal that "it has a much more interesting history that she thought" and actually floated around the sea four months before she was noticed.

Move down for the video

The picture below, tweeted on November 9, 2018, by Stef Lermmitte of the Delft University of Technology, shows small, newly drilled ice drills. The rectangular iceberg – which was then about 4 kilometers – appeared just north of the curved berg.

WHAT IS TABULAR ICEBERG?

The tabular ice banks severed the edges of the ice shelves in the same way as a nail that prematurely grows and ends.

That's why they have sharp edges.

The sharply engaged iceberg that published the titles at the end of October 2018 had a longer, rougher journey than it was at the beginning.

Iceberg was spotted on October 16, 2018 during the flight for Operation IceBridge -NASA for long-lasting antenna on polar ice.

During the same day of exploring glaciers and ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula, scientist Jeremy Harbeck noticed a striking berga.

Not only were the edges of the iceberg extremely flat, but two angles appeared "square" at right angles.

The scientists used images of the Landsat 8 and Sentinel-1 of the European Space Agency to regain berg in their origins.

Original

The original "monolith" rectangular berg is spotted near the ice shelf Larsen C, and NASA experts believe that the sharp edges are evidence that may have recently broken the shelf

They found that he had actually drifted off from the new ice field in early November 2017, just months after the A-68 broke.

The rectangular berg then began a journey to the north, cruising with new open water between the ice police Larsen C and Iceberg A-68.

Threats to collision were everywhere: A-68 would crash at small ages at all times, and smaller bergers could confront each other.

PROPERTY RECTANGULAR BERG TRAVEL

At the beginning of November 2017, from the new ice police front, only a few months after the A-68 split.

The rectangular berg then began a journey to the north, cruising with new open water between the ice police Larsen C and Iceberg A-68.

Threats to collision were everywhere: A-68 would crash at small ages at all times, and smaller bergers could confront each other.

Berg cruised all the way to the north and through a narrow passage between the northern peak A-68 and a rocky trip near the iceberg called Bavden Ice Rise. NASA / UMBC glaciologist Chris Kuman resembles this zone on nuts.

The area of ​​geometric ice gravel is visible in the Landsat 8 picture of October 14, 2018, two days before IceBridge. The A-68 broke several times against the rise and caused ice pieces to disperse in pure geometric shapes. A few long rectangular berg failed to pass through the insensitive; He broke into smaller parts. The iceberg on Harbeck's photo, surrounded by an annotated satellite image Landsat 8, appears closer to the shape of the trapezoid. The trapezoidal berg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is small compared to the A-68 size Delavare.

The area of ​​geometric ice gravel is visible in the Landsat 8 picture of October 14, 2018, two days before IceBridge. The A-68 broke several times against the rise and caused ice pieces to disperse in pure geometric shapes. A few long rectangular berg failed to pass through the insensitive; He broke into smaller parts. The iceberg on Harbek's photo, surrounded by an annotated satellite image Landsat 8, appears closer to the shape of the trapezoid. The trapezoidal berg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is small compared to the A-68 size Delavare.

The A-68 broke several times against the rise and caused ice pieces to disperse in pure geometric shapes.

The area of ​​geometric ice gravel is visible in the Landsat 8 picture of October 14, 2018, two days before IceBridge.

A few long rectangular berg failed to pass through the insensitive; He broke into smaller parts.

The iceberg on Harbek's photo, surrounded by an annotated satellite image Landsat 8, appears closer to the shape of the trapezoid.

The trapezoidal berg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is small compared to the A-68 size Delavare.

By November 2018, the iceberg moved from a mess of ruins and open waters.

hi tekt

Berg cruised all the way to the north and through a narrow passage between the northern peak A-68 and a rocky trip near the iceberg called Bavden Ice Rise. NASA / UMBC glaciologist Chris Kuman resembles this zone on nuts.

The A-68 broke several times against the rise and caused ice pieces to disperse in pure geometric shapes.

The area of ​​geometric ice gravel is visible in the Landsat 8 picture of October 14, 2018, two days before IceBridge.

A few long rectangular berg failed to pass through the insensitive; He broke into smaller parts.

The iceberg on Harbek's photo, surrounded by an annotated satellite image Landsat 8, appears closer to the shape of the trapezoid.

The trapezoidal berg is about 900 meters wide and 1500 meters long, which is small compared to the A-68 size Delavare.

By November 2018, the iceberg moved from a mess of ruins and open waters.

Schuman said: "Now it's just another iceberg on its way to dying."

The second rectangular berg, known as the "tabular" ice bank, is spotted on the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, near the Larsen C ice shelf and close to the first.

It is part of a large field of berg. NASA experts may have recently broken the shelf and said that sharp angles and flat surfaces are evidence that a break has occurred recently.

Behind the extraordinary rectangular iceberg, visible behind the outboard engine, IceBridge saw another relatively rectangular berg and A68 iceberg in the distance.

Behind the extraordinary rectangular iceberg, visible behind the outboard engine, IceBridge saw another relatively rectangular berg and A68 iceberg in the distance.

The image was taken during the IceBridge flight by exploring the polar ice of the planet that gives a 3D view of the ice that makes the Arctic and Antarctic, providing vital information on how it changes over time.

"I thought this was pretty interesting: I often see the icebergs with relatively flat edges, but I really did not see it earlier with two angles under such real angles as it did," said Iceberg's research associate Jeremy Harbek.

The rectangular ice ice looked fresh from the body of Larsen C, which in July 2017 released a massive ice flank A68, a piece of ice around the size of the Delaware state.

In the second photo (above), Harbeck captured the two edges of the now-known iceberg, and a slightly less rectangular iceberg. This picture also shoots A68 in the distance.

"In fact, I was more interested in catching the iceberg A68 in which we flew before, but I thought that this rectangular ice globe was visually interesting and pretty photogenic, so there are only a few photos on the globe," said Harbeck.

The flight originated from Punta Arenas, Chile, within the five-week distribution of IceBridge, which began on October 10th and is scheduled for November 18th.

The scheme is NASA's longest aerial polar ice poll.

During a study designed to evaluate changes in the height of the ice of several glaciers that lead to packaging Larsen A, B and C, the icebridge support scientist Jeremi Harbeck noticed a very sharp angle, a tabular ice ridge floating between the sea ice from Larsen C ice shelf.

Strange, angular berg is known as a tabular iceberg.

The flight saw a "field" of large iceberg icebergs located between the ice police at Larsen C and the island of ice A-68, which left Larsen C last year, as seen in NASA Operation IceBridge

The flight saw a "field" of large iceberg icebergs located between the ice police at Larsen C and the island of ice A-68, which left Larsen C last year, as seen in NASA Operation IceBridge

This panorama of the entire first iceberg hill was arranged along with two images shot while flying along the berg

This panorama of the entire first iceberg hill was arranged along with two images shot while flying along the berg

"A tabular iceberg can be seen on the right side, floating between the sea of ​​ice ice right from the ice shelf Larsen C," the space agency said.

The sharp corners and the flat surface of the iceberg indicate that she probably recently left the ice shelf. "

Landsat section 8 images of the "square" ice area, with an arrow that identifies the glacier concerned.

Landsat section 8 images of the iceberg area "square", with an arrow that identifies the glacier.

In a LiveScience interview, NASA scientist Kelli Brunt said: "Tabular ice ridge like a nail moving, giving them sharp edges.

"Why this is a bit unusual is what looks almost like a square," she said.

She estimated that its size was about 1 km wide.

The scientists carefully followed Larsen C after the massive ice ice broke and began to spin.

"Pizzaberg": This berg recalls a piece of pizza. A triangular ice cube surrounded by many different types of sea ice, from the ice shelf Larsen in the Veddell Sea. In the open water, ice is formed.

From IceBridge flight # IceBridge Flight: Mountains in the Shekeleton range, bordering with recreational glacier, East Antarctica.

From IceBridge flight # IceBridge Flight: Mountains in the Shekeleton range, bordering with recreational glacier, East Antarctica.

From Friday # IceBridge flight: lead (break in sea ice) that is partially frozen and also continues to freeze. A new, very thin mazut of ice is formed.

From Friday # IceBridge: lead (fracture inside the sea ice), which is partially frozen and also continues to freeze. A new, very thin mazut of ice is formed.

Experts earlier said that the gigantic area, estimated at Delavarea's size, was locked in place, saying that "he probably got stuck on the sea "

"But now the A68 began to move north," said a recent polar oceanographer Mark Markon, who noticed the movement using temperature data collected from the Suomi satellite.

"In the period from 7 to 12 July 2018, weather conditions and ocean currents conjugate to throw thirion tons of large iceberg A68 counterclockwise," he said.

"I suppose the A68a will continue to rotate as it is now around this western point, until the current northern edge hits the front of Larsen C.

"It has a spectacular amount of impulses and it will not be easy to stop. I should think that in the next few months we will see some interesting collisions with ice."

It is thought that the "temperature anomaly" on July 20, 2018, when it was almost 20 ° C warmer than the middle over the Veddell and Larsen Ice shelves, may have triggered the onset of rotation.

The glaciologist and former associate of the MIDAS project, Martin O'Leary, told Earther that the crash was "certainly possible" to suspect that it would have a major impact on the iceberg or shelf given the slowdown rate at which this would happen.

Finally, O & # 39; Leary says that prevailing ocean currents will push the iceberg north and east into the South Ocean "where it is likely to dissolve and dissolve."

Left, "temperature anomaly" on July 20, 2018, when it was almost 20 ° C warmer than the middle over the Veddell Sea and the Larsen Ice Field. Right: Images of Sentinel-1 SAR satellite images of August 29, 2018 show that north of the iceberg the wind pushes ice on ice faster than the iceberg turns. Iceberg A68 recorded with the Sentinel-1 SAR sensor on August 29, 2018, 23:58 UTC, showing the surface of the open water in which the ice ice production is currently taking place.

Last year it was discovered that by the thick ice cover it has so far prevented it from going far to the sea.

An animation that shows its movement over the past few months reveals that the thirty-plus ton Iceberg A-68 has redirected it to damage by sea currents, tide and wind in the Veddell Sea.

Although a huge part of the ice, which is estimated on the size of Delavarea, has moved around some, experts say that its environment has kept something locked in place.

An animation showing its movement over the past few months reveals that billions of tonnes of the Iceberg A-68 have shifted because it is defiled by ocean currents, tides and winds in the Veddell Sea

Iceberg A-68 is the sixth largest iceberg recorded since scientists began to track, and its separation from the iceberg caused fears of future impacts on the global sea level.

Despite all the activities in the Veddell Sea, "its northern end has been based on shallow waters near Bavden Ice Rise," according to Midas researchers who oversaw the iceberg over the past year.

"This basis led eventually to be in May 2018.

"Although not large enough to give them labels, the total area of ​​ice sets lost from A-68 in May was the size of a small town."

Scientists who track the massive iceberg that broke out of Antarctica Larsen C Ice Shelf said last year that the dense cover of the sea ice has so far prevented it from going far to the sea. Shown above in July 2018

Scientists who track the massive iceberg released last year by the Antarctic Larsen C Ice Shelf say that the dense cover of the sea ice has so far prevented it from going far to the sea. Shown above in July 2018

Although a huge part of the ice, which is estimated on the size of Delavarea, has moved around some, experts say that its environment has kept something locked in place. His position was shown in November 2017

Although a huge part of the ice, which is estimated on the size of Delavarea, has moved around some, experts say that its environment has kept something locked in place. His position was shown in November 2017

Earlier this year, scientists released the first shot of "A-68", a trilian tonal ice hill of the size of Delaver that was broken from the Antarctic.

Stunning air pistons occupy a huge cracks in the ice sheet of the Antarctic Larsen C, which led to the third largest iceberg ever recorded from the continent last July.

When the A-68 was separated from Larsen C, it discovered an ocean that was hidden under the ice shelf for 120,000 years, and a team of scientists is now studying the region to discover some of the mysteries of hidden ecosystems.

At the head of the British Antarctic Research (BAS) from Cambridge, the group will explore small animals, microbes and plankton on the seabed to see how they face serious changes in their environment.

Као део прелиминарних истраживања за путовање, екипа је снимила ваздушне снимке леденог брега како би надгледала колико је далеко одлетео на море – први видео снимљен од берг-а, након што је прошле године одлетео из Ларсена Ц-а.

Биолошки биолог др Катрин Линсе, истраживач БАС на челу мисије, рекао је: "Телење А-68 пружа нам јединствен живот у марини, јер одговара драматичним променама у животној средини.

"Важно је да стигнемо тамо брзо пре него што се подводно окружење мења како сунчева светлост улази у воду, а нове врсте почињу да се колонизују.

"Саставили смо тим са широким спектром научних вештина како бисмо могли сакупити што је могуће више информација у кратком времену. То је врло узбудљиво.'

Научници путују бродом како би прикупили узорке из новоизложеног морског дна, који покрива површину од око 2250 квадратних километара.

ШТА ЈЕ А-68 ИЦЕБЕРГ И ШТА ЈЕ ПРИЧИЛИ ДА ПРЕКО ОД АНТАРЦТИЦЕ?

У јулу 2017. године, огромна пукотина на Антарктићкој ледени полици на леду изазвала је трилионски тонски ледени бријег – трећи највећи икада забележен – да се прекине са леденог јужног континента.

Огроман комад леда, названог леденог брега А-68, мери 5.800 квадратних километара, што га чини око величине Делавера, или четири пута веће површине покривене Великим Лондоном.

Пошто се А-68 разбио, остало је нејасно шта ће се догодити с огромном масом, уз страхове да би се могло распасти на комадиће како би се пратили на сателиту, и кренули у транспортне траке.

Невероватне нове сателитске слике откриле су кретање масивног леденог брега који је у јулу сипао са ледене полице Ларсен. Детаљне слике снимљене инструментима на НАСА-овом Ландсат-у 8 показују проширење јаза између главне полице и леда берга, са танким слојем слободног плутајућег леда између

У јулу 2017. године, огромна пукотина на Антарктићкој ледени полици на леду изазвала је трилионски тонски ледени бријег – трећи највећи икада забележен – да се прекине са леденог јужног континента. Ове детаљне слике су снимљене инструментима на сателитском сателитском уређају Наса

Стручњаци су открили да пукотине и даље расте на Ларсену Ц, а ако и даље расте, могуће је да се ледени колосек сломи.

Ако се Ларсен Ц сруши, лед може да додати још 4 инча (10 цм) на глобални ниво мора током година.

Многи научници тврде да догађај телења није нужно последица климатских промена.

Уместо тога, може једноставно одражавати природни раст и циклус упада на ледени полици.

Тим каже да је њихова мисија хитна јер се екосистем који се вероватно скрива испод леда хиљадама година може променити јер сунчева светлост почиње да мења површинске слојеве мора.

Тим ће истражити подручје раније под леденом пољем сакупљањем морских плодова, микроба, планктона, седимената и узорака воде користећи низ опреме укључујући видео камере и посебну санку повучен дуж морског дна за прикупљање ситних животиња.

Такође ће забиљежити било који морски сисар и птице које су се можда преселиле у подручје. Њихови налази ће пружити слику о томе који је живот испод леденог пола био као да се могу пратити промене екосистема.

А-68 је дебљине 620 стопа (190 метара) од врха до дна, са само 30 метара од њега видљив је изнад океана.

Ицеберг је формиран једним пукотинама уз Ларсен Ц, његову матичну ледену полицу и чини нешто више од 10 посто полица.

БАС истраживачи су летели око леденог брега како би добили бољи поглед на то док се крећу у море Ведделл.

Ово ново изложено морско подручје је прво које има користи од међународног споразума који је 2016. године направила Комисија за очување животних морских ресурса на Антарктику (ЦЦАМЛР).

Ивица А-68, ледени брег који је телило са ледене полице Ларсен Ц. Наса је ову слику узео у новембру током лета који је био део свог програма ИцеБридге, који ће истраживачима помоћи да разумеју подлогу испод леда

Ивица А-68, ледени брег који је телило са ледене полице Ларсен Ц. Наса је ову слику узео у новембру током лета који је био део свог програма ИцеБридге, који ће истраживачима помоћи да разумеју подлогу испод леда

Овај споразум означава Специјална подручја за научно истраживање у новонасталим морским подручјима након слома или повлачења ледених полица преко подручја Антарктичког полуострва.

Споразум је услиједио након приједлога Европске уније за ЦЦАМЛР, на челу са научницима БАС.

Професор Давид Ваугхан, научни директор БАС-а, рекао је: "Опуштање А-68 нуди нову и без преседана могућност успостављања интердисциплинарног научног истраживачког програма у овом климатско осјетљивом региону.

"Сада је вријеме за рјешавање фундаменталних питања о одрживости поларних континенталних полица под климатским промјенама.

"Морамо бити одважни на овом. Ларсен Ц је дугачак јужни и на овом подручју има пуно морског леда, али ово је важна наука, па ћемо покушати да се наш тим упути тамо где треба. "

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